Brainflow Feed

That term first came to my mind when, as a child, I’d try to say “stream of consciousness” and end up with “brainflow.” It seems to fit here.

Welcome to the ramblings of my mind. (For now, they revolve mostly around films.)

Control

Saturday, December 1st, 2007 9:02 pm—Film

Control (UK/USA/Australia/Japan 2007, Biography/Drama/Music), Writer: Matt Greenhalgh; Director: Anton Corbijn

I finally made it back to the ByTowne! And I didn’t even have to renew my membership, thanks to BD’s free movie passes. ;-)

We saw Control last week. (Wow—just writing this makes me crave ByTowne popcorn…) It’s a stunning, hyper-realistic documentation of the life of Ian Curtis, (Sam Riley) the deeply talented, volatile lead singer of England’s Joy Division. As Curtis’ problems with epilepsy, and self-diagnosed and misdiagnosed drugs, spiraled out of control, his depression and self-destructive tendencies worsened until he committed suicide at the age of 23.

The script is based on Touching From a Distance, a memoir written by Curtis’ wife Deborah. It unfolds very well, asking viewers to make a few leaps rather than spelling everything out word for word. And it doesn’t hurt that the dry British sense of humour comes through in little bursts.

Adding to the realism is the fact that Control is directed by Anton Corbijn, the photographer for Joy Division during the band’s heyday. With exceptional direction and gorgeous black and white cinematography, Corbijn recreates the atmosphere of Britain’s 70s rock scene with an insight that could only come from someone who lived through it. The film is a brilliant, bittersweet tribute to Joy Division, featuring some outstanding performances. Riley in particular is pitch-perfect; he delivers a painfully beautiful portrayal of Curtis’ mental illness.

Control is a bit like a stiff drink. It’s not everyone’s taste, so I don’t recommend it unilaterally to all of you reading this blog. But if you’re in the mood for something unusual, dark and honest, see this film. It will certainly be time well-spent.

Now I’m going outside to spend time in the cold, cold snow.

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